Drop the cup

https://www.loyolapress.com/catholic-resources/liturgical-year/lent/perspectives-on-lent/articles/looking-at-lent-through-the-lens-of-grace/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Living+Lent+Daily%3A+March+21%2C+2022&utm_campaign=living-lent-daily22-week-3-7074-yoc-mar21&vgo_ee=bb83POd3yq3Dybqtr0jyP2QOP8ZXmRzMvz3Yw%2BcA7gI%3D I'm sharing the link above because the excerpt talks about an openness to God's grace. Those two word - God's grace - are my watchwords for 2022 and, I hope, the rest of my life. I have written about grace many times, but right now it is becoming clearer to me that I need … Continue reading Drop the cup

Scraps from the table…

Today’s reading in the Church’s liturgical year is from Mark’s Gospel, not Matthew’s, but it’s a version of the same account. Mark identifies the woman as Syro-Phoenician; Matthew as Canaanite. She is both. The first description is about her nationality; the latter is her ethnicity. But the main point is, she is not Jewish like Jesus…Please open and read for more! God bless you.

Drowning in Lemonade

In the Gospel of Matthew, Chapter 15, verses 21-28, we read of the faith of the Canaanite woman. She begs Jesus to deliver her daughter from an evil spirit and the suffering it is causing her. Jesus explains that He came for the sake of “the lost sheep of Israel.” That seems rather harsh and also not the whole story as Jesus helps more than one person who is not from the House of Israel. I think his reply has more to do with His foreknowledge that she’s a woman who is clever, has her wits about her, and that she is obviously a woman of great faith in Jesus’ power to defeat evil.

The proof of Jesus’ knowledge of the Canaanite woman’s quick wittedness is in her response to His remark about who He came to save. He uses the example of masters withholding the food meant for their…

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